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2nd session: Winter – Spring (January-April 2004)

1st December 2003

The Great Britain – Russia Society
2nd session: Winter – Spring (January – April 2004)

8 major topics, 8 unsurpassed experts, 4 venues, a vintage session

Thursday 15th January 2004, University of London Union, Malet Sreet 6.30 for 7.00 p.m (Room 3E)
“The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War”
DR. DAVID CAUTE (Fellow of the Royal Society for Literature)
In the Chair: Julian Graffy (Professor of Russian Literature & Cinema, SSEES)

Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Bernstein, Britten, the Beatles, Eisenstein, Brecht, Miller, Kazan, Sartre. Picasso, Pollock, Nureyev, Balanchine.

Knights or pawns in the cultural chess of the Cold War?

The Cold War was simultaneously a political – military confrontation and a cultural contest of a new kind. Striving to
demonstrate a superior claim to civilised values and the heritage of the Enlightenment, two imperial ideologies
mobilised their best ballerinas, actors, composers, musicians, poets, playwrights, painters, film makers, chess
players and athletes. The prize? Winning the hearts and minds of the people of the world in the age of the mass
media.

Immensely articulate, author of “The Fellow Travellers” and “The Great Fear”, Dr David Caute in a masterly
panoramic overview will explore the cultural Cold War ranging over film, classical & popular music, ballet, painting,
sculpture as well as propaganda by exhibition.

David Caute. Gained a First in Modern History at Oxford, scholar of St Antony’s College, a Henry Fellow at Harvard
& a Fellow of All Souls. Visiting Professor at New York, Columbia & Indiana Universities, Regent’s Lecturer at the
University of California. Reader in Social & Political Theory at Brunel University. Former Literary & Arts Editor of “The
New Statesman” etc.

A STUPENDOUS START TO 2004.

Dr David Caute’s “The Dancer defects: the struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War” (785 pages)
should be on sale at the meeting with a special discount to members.

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THE HIGHLIGHT OF 2004!
Tuesday 3rd February 2004 in the Swedenborg Hall, 20/21 Bloomsbury Way WC1A 2TH 6.30 for 7p.m.
The entrance to the Hall is in Barter Street. Nearest tube stations: Holborn(& Tottenham Court Road)
There will be a complimentary wine reception from 6.30 p.m. to 7.00 p.m.
HIS EXCELLENCY THE AMBASSADOR OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Mr GRIGORY BORISOVICH KARASIN
In the chair: Sir Rodric Braithwaite GCMG
(British Ambassador to the USSR 1988-91 & to the Russian Federation 1991-92)

This talk will be in English.

Grigory Borisovich Karasin is one of the most senior and distinguished members of the Diplomatic Corps of the
Russian Federation. He has been the official spokesman for the Russian Government and a Deputy Foreign Minister.
Totally fluent in English, with a polished delivery, the Russian Ambassador is highly regarded by all those who have
met him, and is a friendly and persuasive advocate for his country.
Mr Karasin will talk about the present situation in the Russian Federation both economically and socially, the
achievements to date, the prospects for the future, problems, relations and interests in common with other countries,
and areas of divergence.

What do we think about current developments in the Russian Federation?
After his address the Russian Ambassador will reply to your questions.

A “MUST ATTEND” EVENT. PROMPT BOOKING IS RECOMMENDED.

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Monday 23rd February 2004 at the Cardinal Inn, 23 Francis Street SW1P 1DN 6.30 p.m. for 7.00 p.m.

The 2nd Lecture in the series on International Relations:
“Russia, her Neighbours and other Great Powers”.

“U.S. – SOVIET RELATIONS: DID “CONTAINMENT” WORK?”
DR. PETER BOYLE

From the carnage of World War 2 there emerged two superpowers – the USA and the USSR. Whilst Dr. Boyle will
allude to relations between these two Great Powers in earlier times his talk will concentrate on the struggle for power
in the post war world.

Until Soviet Communism unexpectedly imploded and collapsed in 1991, to what extent was George Frost Kennan’s
policy of “containment” a success or failure?

Dr Peter Boyle. History graduate of Glasgow University. Obtained his PhD at UCLA (University of California Los
Angeles). He is Senior Lecturer in American History, in the School of American and Canadian Studies, University of
Nottingham. He has been Visiting Professor at Cornell University, and at the Universities of Wisconsin & Colorado.
He has written numerous articles in Journals on the history of American foreign policy particularly US-Soviet
Relations and Anglo-American Relations. His major books include “American-Soviet Relations: from the Russian
Revolution to the Fall of Communism” and “The Churchill-Eisenhower correspondence (1953-1955)” (editor).

ONE OF THE MOST VITAL TOPICS IN THIS SERIES. DON’T MISS IT.

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Monday 8th March 2004, Swedenborg Hall, 20/21 Bloomsbury Way WC1A2TH 6.30 p.m. for 7.00 p.m.
Nearest tube station is Holborn (Central & Piccadilly lines). Entrance to the Hall is in Barter Street.
“THE RUSSIAN PARLIAMENTARY & PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. WHAT DIRECTION WILL THE POLITICS TAKE?”
DR. YITZHAK BRUDNY
In the Chair: Professor Archie Brown (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Putin’s Russia (unlike Yeltsin’s) is a financially sounder and more orderly State. But to what extent have civic freedom
and a more liberal democracy been curtailed? Does the presence of FSB men (siloviki) in key positions presage a
shift towards authoritarianism? Will the oligarchs be emasculated, might their exploration licences be revoked? Will
current investment in the Russian oil industry secure commercial and legal safeguards for Westerners? What do
ordinary Russians think? How will they vote? What is the relative strength of the parties and what do they stand for?
In the likely event of Putin being re-elected what should we expect?

Dr. Yitzhak Brudny obtained his MA and PhD at Princeton University NJ. He is Associate Professor of Political
Sccience and Russian Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His books include “Reinventing Russia:
Russian Nationalism and the Soviet State 1953-91” and “Restructuring Russia: the Postcommunist years” (coeditor).
Has lectured at the Universities of Columbia, Harvard & Yale.

Come and listen to a shrewd and seasoned analyst of Russian elections and of politics in the Kremlin.

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Wednesday 24th March 2004, The Cardinal Inn, 23 Francis Street, London SW1P 1DN 6.30 for 7 p.m.
“THE USSR AND THE EURO DOLLAR”
MR. FRANK BICKNELL

A well concealed aspect of the financial realities beneath the surface at the height of the Cold War. Also a plan to
zone off a part of Siberia (about the size of Wales) to be a capitalist enterprise style zone for Copper. And General
Alexander Lebed’s overseas bank accounts.

This is the incredible story of collaboration between a former Director of the Bank of England and Chairman
Sveshnikov of the USSR’s Central Bank Gosbank, leading to experiments in the 1960s (first in Hungary, later in a
limited way in the USSR) towards Western financing of individual industries. This is how the USSR came to be drawn
into working with the international banking system. A talk that will provide new revelations about which some of our
leading specialists are blissfully unaware!

Frank Bicknell. RAF officer during the war when he learned Russian. Oxford graduate. Member of the Anglo-Soviet
Control Commission for Finland. Practised as a barrister at law. Became an International Investment Banker and
Manager for Eastern Europe with the Bank of London and South America Ltd. Asst.General Manager Midland &
International Banks Ltd. Part of a long, distinguished and colourful career.

ASTONISHING NEW INSIGHTS – NOT TO BE MISSED!

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Tuesday 6th April, at the British Academy,10 Carlton House Terrace SW1Y 5AH 6.45 for 7.00p.m.
(nearest tube stations are Piccadilly Circus & Charing Cross)
“THE INFLUENCE OF RUSSIAN IMPERIALISM IN THE EARLY 19th
CENTURY IN THE CAUCASUS ON GRIBOYEDOV, PUSHKIN AND
LERMONTOV”
MR. LAURENCE KELLY
In the Chair: His Excellency the Russian Ambassador, Mr Grigory B. Karasin.

Russian imperialism in the mountainous and romantic Caucasus fired the imagination of three of the most brilliant
and short – lived stars in the Golden Age of Russian Poetry. In Russia where “literature is a second government”
(Solzhenitsyn), Griboyedov, Pushkin and Lermontov in turn were to influence future generations of countless
Russians.

Laurence Kelly. History scholar at New College, Oxford. His interest in Russia and Russian dates from a visit to his
Father Sir David Kelly GCMG MC, British Ambassador to the USSR under Stalin, in 1947. In 1971 he followed
Lermontov’s footsteps deep into the Caucasus. His books include “Lermontov: Tragedy in the Caucasus” “Diplomacy
& Murder in Tehran” the first ever biography of the poet Alexander Griboyedov in English, and “A traveller’s
companion to St. Petersburg” as well as to Moscow and Istanbul. Formerly an officer in the Life Guards, and
Chairman of Helical Bar PLC.

Enjoy the splendour of the British Academy. Listen to a leading specialist
authority on Griboyedov and Lermontov. Early booking is essential.

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Saturday 17thApril, at the Cardinal Inn, 23 Francis Street SW1P 1DN at 12 noon
“FURIOUS VISSARION: BELINSKII’S STRUGGLE FOR LITERATURE,
LOVE AND IDEAS”
PROFESSOR EMERITUS RICHARD FREEBORN D.LITT.

Vissarion Grigoryevich Belinskii (1811-1848) one of the Raznochintsy, a founding member of the Russian
intelligentsia, Russia’s greatest literary critic, “discoverer” of Dostoevsky, author of the famous Letter to Gogol, friend
of Herzen and Turgenev. Struggled as a critic to nurture a literature that expressed ideas and positive tendencies,
whilst natural in expression. This was to influence the developing movement of 19th century Realism. Father of the
“civic” tendency in Russian criticism whose heirs were Chernyshevski, Dobroliubov and Pisarev. In the ongoing
debate between Slavophils and Westernisers Belinskii was an impassioned Westerniser.

Richard Freeborn, Emeritus Professor of Russian Literature at SSEES (now part of UCL) University of London is one
of the English speaking world’s most eminent authorities on Russian Literature. Author of the definitive work on
Turgenev and books on the Russian 19th century novel and the Russian Revolutionary novel. Also a translator.
Professor Freeborn writes with matchless grace and elegance.

OUR FIRST MID-DAY TALK. A NEW TREAT – UNMISSABLE!

Professor Richard Freeborn’s recently published studies on Dostoevsky and Belinskii should be on sale at the
meeting with a special discount for members, who may wish to lunch together afterwards.

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Thursday 29th April, University of London Union Malet Street, at 6.30 p.m. for 7.00 p.m. (Room 3D)
“RUSSIAN LONG AND WINDING ROAD TO THE WORLD TRADE
ORGANISATION”
Professor Julian Cooper
In the Chair: Dr Alena Ledeneva, Reader in Russian Polictics & Society at SSEES

Russia is one of the few countries still outside the World Trade Centre Organisation (WTO), in company with such
nations as Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia and North Korea. An application to join was made in 1993, but now a decade later
accession is still uncertain. Under Putin negotiations have been pursued with more energy and commitment yet
serious obstacles remain. Why is WTO accession proving so difficult? What does Russia stand to gain, or lose?
What forces in Russia are in favour, or opposed? What has been the role of the EU and the USA, help or hindrance?
When, if ever, is membership likely to be achieved?

Julian Cooper, Professor of Russian Economic Studies and Deputy Director, Centre for Russian and East European
Studies of the University of Birmingham. He has been at the Centre since he was a postgraduate student in the late
1960s and served as Director from 1990 to 2001. His research is concerned with the Russian economy, in particular
the economics of defence, Russia’s place in the global technology, and the development of the ‘new economy’ –
information technology, communications and the Internet – in ex-communist countries. His books include The
Technological Level of Soviet Industry (1977), Industrial Innovation in the Soviet Union (1982), Technical Progress
and Soviet Economic Development (1986) and The Soviet Defence Industry: Conversion and Reform (1991).

A regular contributor to the SIPRI Yearbook, on Russian military economic developments.

A FABULOUS FINALE TO THE SESSION

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Tickets are not issued for meetings, but names will be put on the relevant attendance lists on a first come first served
basis. Members are encouraged to book places for their guests. Cancellations for credit are accepted only if before
5 p.m. on the previous afternoon (phone Ute Chatterjee on 07866 849599 or email her at:
[removed]) so that those on the waiting list can be offered places. If you require confirmation of your
booking please send a stamped addressed envelope. You can contact the Chairman Daniel Salbstein c/o
J.Salbstein, Brougham Road, Worthing, West Sussex BN11 2NX, 01903 210611 (phone & fax).
Email: [removed].

Members paying for at least 6 meetings pay only £4 per meeting, a discount of 20%!

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