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Lecture Programme (January – April 2006)

1st January 2006

Registered with the Charity Commission for England and Wales. Charity No. 1105296
Honorary President: The Lord Browne of Madingley (Group Chief Executive of BP plc)
Honorary Vice Presidents (in alphabetical order)
Professor Geoffrey Alan Hosking F.B.A, F.R.Hist.S, Sir Roderic Lyne K.B.E, C.M.G,
The Rt. Hon Sir Malcolm Rifkind KCMG QC MP, The Rt. Hon Lord Robertson of Port Ellen GCMG,
The Right Honourable Baroness Williams of Crosby

THE GREAT BRITAIN – RUSSIA SOCIETY
Winter – Spring Session (January – April 2006)
MRS. OLGA SELIVANOVA LEADS CONVERSATIONS IN RUSSIAN BEFORE MOST TALKS

A succession of stellar speakers – including many world-class authorities!

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Thursday 12 January 2006, Cardinal Inn, 23 Francis St. London SW1P 1DN, at 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

“RUSSIA: THE EUROPEAN DIMENSION”
MR. PAUL FORREST
Mr Forrest will outline how the economy of the Russian Federation is adapting to the rules of the Western economies and becoming more open. Members will want to know if poverty is being tackled, to what extent the infrastructure of social services is improving. Members will want to know also how safe it is to invest as individuals in Companies in the Russian Federation, and what are the safeguards for Companies wishing to produce or trade there. Leasehold security, the ability to repatriate profits, the laws on contract, the legal system, the transparency of the taxation regime, corruption and the mafia are all relevant concerns. Do the Russian people welcome investment by foreign companies?

Paul Forrest is Head of Research at the Moscow Narodny Bank (incorporated in the City of London since 1919). He is responsible for economic research and analysis throughout the Group. Studied politics at Warwick University and has a Masters degree in Economic Development. In 1998 was seconded to the Commercial Section of the British Embassy in Moscow. Is currently a Director of the Russo-British Chamber of Commerce. Paul Forrest has worked for the Bank since 1994. Under his guidance the Research Department of Moscow Narodny Bank publishes daily fixed income commentary and monthly economic and market overviews for Russia and neighbouring emerging markets. The Bank also publishes research on Russia’s regions, industrial sectors, corporates and bond issuers. Being both Head of Research at Moscow Narodny Bank and a Director of the flourishing Russo-British Chamber of Commerce, Paul Forrest is uniquely qualified to answer all our questions.

RELEVANT AND TOPICAL – FROM AN EXPERT AT THE SHARP END.

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Tuesday 31 January 2006, Cardinal Inn, 23 Francis St, London SW1P 1DN at 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

“JOSEPH BRODSKY: THE POWER OF POETRY”
PROFESSOR VALENTINA POLUKHINA (in Russian)
In the Chair: Professor Faith Wigzell
Brodsky- the last Russian poet taken seriously by Soviet rulers. Khrushchev and his henchmen staged his trial (1964) and sent him into Northern exile (1964-65). Brezhnev and Andropov forced him out of his country (1972). Gorbachev paid him a visit in Washington (1992) where Brodsky had an office as US Poet Laureate. Yeltsin & Chernomyrdin attempted to correct the image of Russian tyranny by urging his widow to bury Brodsky in St. Petersburg. This lecture will examine how Brodsky, who left school at 15, became a Professor at several American Universities, receiving the highest honours and awards in the Western world: a Guggenheim Fellowship (1976), the Mondello Prize (1979), a MacArthur Fellopwship (1981), the Nobel Prize for Literature (1987), an Oxford Hon. D.Litt (1991). He was also awarded the Legion d’Honneur (1991) and an honorary citizenship of Florence and St. Petersburg (1991). On what grounds was Brodsky regarded as one of the pre-eminent poets of our time? What can we learn from his career? THIS TALK IS IN RUSSIAN.

Valentina Polukhina – born Siberia, educated at Kemerovo, Tula and Moscow Universities. From 1962 to 1973 taught at Moscow’s Lumumba University, and from 1973 until 2001was Professor of Russian Literature at Keele University, England. She is the author of several major studies of Brodsky, on which she is a world-class authority. With her husband Professor Daniel Weissbort she has co-edited An Anthology of Contemporary Russian Women Poets (2005).

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Wednesday 15 February, University of London Union, Malet St London WC1E 7HY 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

“MOSCOW – AN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY”
(A TALK ILLUSTRATED WITH SLIDES)
PROFESSOR LINDSEY HUGHES
Moscow’s architecture will be examined against the background of the city’s dramatic history. Focuses first on the Moscow Kremlin as the seat of power of the rulers of Muscovy. In the 18th century Moscow was partially eclipsed by the new westernised capital, St. Petersburg, but returned to fashion in the 19th century. A growing taste for traditional and medieval architecture was epitomized by the late Tsarist ‘Muscovite revival’ style. In the 1930s Moscow was redesigned by Stalin’s architects to become the model of the Soviet Utopia towards which all other cities were to aspire. Highlights included the Metro and Stalin’s ‘wedding cake’ high-rise building. The final part looks at post-Soviet attempts to reconcile the old (as reflected for example, in the restoration of monuments demolished in the 1920s-30s) with the demands of a modern capitalist city.

Lindsey Hughes is Professor of Russian History at the School of Slavonic & East European Studies, University College London, and is a world- class authority on Petrine Imperial Russia. Since 1976 she has been the author, translator or (co) editor of some 17 books. Major works include Sophia, Regent of Russia 1657-1704 and Russia in the Age of Peter the Great. Professor Hughes’ PhD thesis at Cambridge was on late 17th century ‘Moscow Baroque’ architecture, and she lectures on the history of Russian art and architecture at both BA and MA level.

A DELIGHTFUL AESTHETIC MEANDER THROUGH SPACE AND TIME.

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Monday 27 February, SSEES new building. 16 Taviton St, WC1, 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

A Joint meeting of the School of Slavonic & East European Studies and The Great Britain – Russia Society, courtesy of SSEES.
The talk is in Rooms 431with 433 on the 4th Floor(take the lift)
With a complimentary wine reception in the Senior Common Room from 6.30 until 7.00p.m.

RUSSIA, HER NEIGHBOURS AND OTHER GREAT POWERS
This is the fifth in a series of Lectures on International Relations
“POLAND AND RUSSIA: INCOMPATIBLE VIEWS ON A SHARED PAST”
PROFESSOR NORMAN DAVIES C.M.G. F.B.A. F.R. Hist.S.
In the Chair: Professor George Kolankiewicz (the Director of SSEES)
Poland & Russia are both Slav nations, but they have been at loggerheads throughout much of history. In the early seventeenth century the Poles for a short time occupied Moscow. By the end of the eighteenth century Poland had been virtually erased from the map of Europe, carved up by the Romanovs, the Hapsburgs and the Hohenzollerns. Western Ukraine for four centuries, and between the two World Wars, belonged to Poland. Poles supported the Orange Revolution in Ukraine, and Poland’s Defence Minister Radek Sikorsky recently threw open its top secret Warsaw Pact military archives revealing the Soviet bloc’s vision of a 7 day atomic holocaust between Nato & Warsaw Pact forces, in which 2 million Poles might have died, and with Poland all but wiped off the face of the earth.

Norman Davies, MA Magdalen College Oxford, MA University of Sussex, PhD Jagiellonian University Cracow, Alaistair Horne Research Fellow St. Antony’s. At SSEES as Lecturer 1969-71, as Reader 1971-84, and as Professor of Polish History (1985-96). Now Supernumerary Fellow at Wolfson College Oxford. Has been visiting Professor at the Universities of Columbia, McGill, Hokkaido, Stanford and Harvard. Hon. Citizen of Cracow and decorated with the Order of Merit Poland. His main publications are White Eagle, Red Star: The Polish-Soviet War 1919-20,God’s Playground (2 vols) Microcosm: A Portrait of a Central European City (with Roger Moorhouse), Europe: A History, The Isles: A History, Rising ’44: The Battle for Warsaw. “Norman Davies (whose wife was born in Lviv) knows more about Poland than any other historian in the West, and possesses a deep romantic love for the Polish people” (with acknowledgement to Max Hastings).

ONLY 70 SEATS FOR SOCIETY MEMBERS. EARLY BOOKING ‘A MUST’!

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Wednesday March 15, University of London Union, Malet St .London WC1E 7HY 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

“RUSSIA’S MONETARY POLICY – ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC REFORMS”
PROFESSOR BRIGITTE GRANVILLE
This lecture deals with the dynamics of monetary policy in Russia since 1992 – the relation between the interest rate, the inflation rate, exchange rate, and money supply – to indicate what type of policy has been followed by the central bank. The authorities have been pulled between the goal of reducing inflation and the goal of restraining the real exchange rate appreciation. Whilst Russian macroeconomic performance has improved greatly since the 1998 financial crisis, positive steps have been undermined by a lack of resolve by the monetary authorities to introduce a monetary framework whereby low inflation is clearly stated as the priority. The need is to invigorate the pace of structural reforms and not to manipulate the exchange rate.

Brigitte Granville is Professor of International Economics and Economic Policy at Queen Mary College, University of London. Has been Director of the International Economics Programme at Chatham House & Vice President for Russia with investment bankers J.P. Morgan. Was a consultant advisor to the Ministry of Finance of the Russian Federation & the Central Bank of Uzbekistan.

A VITAL PRESENTATION FROM AN INTERNATIONAL AUTHORITY, DEALING WITH ISSUES CONFRONTING ALL GOVERNMENTS.

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Thursday 30 March, Swedenborg Hall,20/21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.

Entrance to the Hall is via Barter St. Nearest tube station is Holborn (central & Piccadilly lines)
There will be a complimentary wine reception from 6.30 until 7.00 p.m.

VERY GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY ‘THE RUSSIA HOUSE’
“RUSSIA’S FLIGHT PATH: TOWARDS INTEGRATION OR SEPARATION, MODERNISATION OR STAGNATION, PROSPERITY FOR ALL OR WEALTH FOR THE FEW?”
SIR RODERIC LYNE K.B.E. C.M.G.
Sir Roderic Lyne continues to visit Russia frequently since retiring from the Diplomatic Service in December 2004. He firmly believes that a closer relationship between Russia & Western Europe would be in the interests of both. This will be achieved only if we are honest in our analysis, realistic about the timescale and the difficulty of the transition, which Russia is making. In this talk Sir Roderic will attempt to explore some of the many contradictions and paradoxes of the transition process.

Sir Roderic Lyne, 34 years in the Diplomatic Service, was Britain’s Ambassador from January 2000 until August 2004. Now works as a consultant & special advisor to the BP Group & to HSBC Bank. Was the UK’s Permanent Representative to the WTO and the UN and other international organisations in Geneva from 1997 until 2000. From 1993 to 1996 was Private Secretary to Prime Minister John Major, responsible for foreign and European affairs, defence and security.

A PENETRATING ANALYSIS BY BRITAIN’S TOP EXPERT ON THE SPOT, WHO IS ALSO AN HONORARY VICE PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY.

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Monday 10 April, University of London Union, Malet St WC1E 7HY at 6.30 for 7.00 p.m.(Room 3E)

“THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTIONARY NOVEL”
PROFESSOR EMERITUS RICHARD FREEBORN D.Litt
Russian history in the twentieth century has been dominated by revolution. The Russian revolutionary novel, as a template for both the revolutionary hero and consequent revolutionary change, evolved through Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons and the work of Chernyshevsky, Stepniak–Kravchinsky, Gorky and Bely into a fictional genre that explored the experience of revolution in a great variety of ways, culminating in Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago. The genre is a uniquely Russian phenomenon and of central importance in Russian literature.

Richard Freeborn (MA & D.Phil Oxford, and D.Litt London) was an Oxford don for ten years. He was a Professor at UCLA and at Manchester, and then Professor of Russian Literature at the School of Slavonic & East European Studies in the Federal University of London from 1964 until his retirement in 1988. Author of books on Turgenev, the rise of the Russian novel and the Russian revolutionary novel as well as a history of Russia, translations of works by Turgenev and Dostoevsky, and four novels, two of which have enjoyed success on both sides of the Atlantic. Professor Richard Freeborn, who writes with exceptional grace and elegance, is Britain’s pre-eminent and indeed a world-class authority on Russian literature. Russian literature is inextricably bound up with Russia’s history.

A LITERARY ‘MASTER CLASS’- A RARE TREAT – UNMISSABLE!

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Thursday 27 April 2006,at 6.30 p.m. Boothroyd Room, Portcullis House, Bridge St, Westminster.
Portcullis House is the new Office Block for the House of Commons. Next door to Westminster tube.
This meeting is being hosted by Mr. John Randall M.P. and is in conjunction with the All Party Parliamentary Group for Russia.

This talk starts earlier, at 6.30 p.m. Please be seated by 6.15 p.m.

H.E. THE AMBASSADOR OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION
MR. YURY VIKTOROVICH FEDOTOV
In the Chair: The Rt. Hon. Sir Malcolm Rifkind K.C.M.G. Q.C. M.P.
(Britain’s Foreign Secretary 1995-1997)
Born in 1947, Mr Fedotov entered the Diplomatic Service in 1971. He has had postings in Algeria, India and in the United States of America. From 1991-1993 he was Deputy Head of the Department of International Relations in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. From 1993-1999 he was Russia’s Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations. From 1999-2002 he was Director of the Department of International Organisations in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. From 2002 until his appointment as Ambassador to Britain in 2005 he was Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs.

In a wide- ranging overview, His Excellency the Ambassador, continuing a tradition of cooperation, will be happy to brief members of the Society on the current political and economic situation in the Russian Federation, as well as latest developments in bilateral relations. After his address the Ambassador will reply to questions.

This meeting is free of charge. Restricted to the All Party Parliamentary Committee for Russia, and to paid-up Society members and their Guests. Priority booking for Members only until January 31st. There after, subject to availability, bookings will be allocated to Members’ Guests. If you are booking for your Guests as well as yourself, enclose a stamped addressed envelope.
110 seats only. Book early to avoid disappointment.

A ‘MUST ATTEND’ EVENT, AND A FITTING FINALE TO THE SESSION.

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Tickets are not issued for meetings, but names will be put on the relevant attendance lists on a first paid, first served basis. Members are most definitely encouraged to book places for their guests. Cancellations for credit are accepted only if received before 5.00 p.m. on the previous afternoon (‘phone Ute Chatterjee on 0788 4464 461) so that those on the waiting list can be offered places. If you require confirmation of your reservations or confirmation about your guests for the Russian Ambassador’s talk please enclose a stamped addressed envelope. You can contact the Chairman Daniel Salbstein c/o J. Salbstein, Brougham Road, Worthing, West Sussex BN11 2NX, ‘phone & fax 01903 210611 or email: here
All tickets, apart from the talk at Portcullis House, are £5 per person per seat for everyone (except for students belonging to a corporate membership)

BOOK EARLY, AND BOOK OFTEN!
Remember, if all seats are wanted your reservation is assured only if you have PREPAID.

Please keep the short version of the programme – and photocopy the side with the meetings
TO DISTRIBUTE TO AND RECRUIT NEW MEMBERS!

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